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One's-Self I Sing by Walt Whitman

Analysis

"One's-Self I Sing" is a poem written by Walt Whitman. This poem is a bit self righteous. Or, at the very least, very nationalistic. He's claiming that he sings with everyone in America no matter whether they are male or female. He does this for himself and no one else. However, he claims he is doing it for someone else, "separate Person".

This poem is written as three stanzas. The first stanza is written as a couplet while the second and third stanzas have three lines.

Poem

One's-Self I Sing
By 

One's-self I sing-a simple, separate Person;
Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-masse.

Of Physiology from top to toe I sing;
Not physiognomy alone, nor brain alone, is worthy for the muse'I say the Form complete is worthier far;
The Female equally with the male I sing.

Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power,
Cheerful-for freest action form'd, under the laws divine,
The Modern Man I sing.

Next: Reconciliation
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Nationality
American

Literary Movement
19th Century

Subjects
Life, Patriotic