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The Rose in the Deeps of His Heart by William Butler Yeats

Analysis

"The Rose in the Deeps of His Heart" is a poem written by William Butler Yeats. This poem can be taken in two different ways. One way is that something happened between Yeats and his love to make him have bad feelings towards her, yet he still loves her with "a rose in the deeps of [his] heart". Another way to take this is more in a literal meaning. It could mean that seeing all the sadness in the world makes him also sad, but he is happy to have her in his heart and it is one of the few things that makes him happy in the gloomy world.

This poem is written in four stanzas with four lines in each. It is not written in a rhyme scheme. However, this poem is written in iambic-tetrameter.

Poem

The Rose in the Deeps of His Heart
By 

All things uncomely and broken, 
all things worn-out and old, 
The cry of a child by the roadway, 
the creak of a lumbering cart, 

The heavy steps of the ploughman, 
splashing the wintry mould, 
Are wronging your image that blossoms 
a rose in the deeps of my heart. 

The wrong of unshapely things 
is a wrong too great to be told; 
I hunger to build them anew 
and sit on a green knoll apart, 

With the earth and the sky and the water, 
remade, like a casket of gold 
For my dreams of your image that blossoms 
a rose in the deeps of my heart.

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