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To the King's Most Excellent Majesty 1768 by Phillis Wheatley

Analysis

"To the King's Most Excellent Majesty 1768" is a poem written by Phillis Wheatley. This poem is addressed both to King George and God. The poem praises King George by saying she hopes his "brows may flourish long" and she hopes his "sceptre num'rous nations sway". She goes on to say that she wishes the people could reward the King for how great he is. She then goes on to say he is "beloved by all the nations round". Towards the end, she starts to talk to God by saying 'direct, and guard him from on high, / And from his head let ev'ry evil fly!".

"To the King's Most Excellent Majesty 1768" is a one stanza poem with fifteen lines. Many of the lines are written in iambic-pentameter, but most notably, the first line isn't. Instead, it has six syllables and is in iambic-triameter. As well, the first line does not rhyme with any other lines while the rest are rhymed in heroic couplets.

Poem

To the King's Most Excellent Majesty 1768
By 

Your subjects hope, dread Sire--
The crown upon your brows may flourish long,
And that your arm may in your God be strong!
O may your sceptre num'rous nations sway,
And all with love and readiness obey!
But how shall we the British king reward!
Rule thou in peace, our father, and our lord!
Midst the remembrance of thy favours past,
The meanest peasants most admire the last
May George, beloved by all the nations round,
Live with heav'ns choicest constant blessings crown'd!
Great God, direct, and guard him from on high,
And from his head let ev'ry evil fly!
And may each clime with equal gladness see
A monarch's smile can set his subjects free

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